Keystone XL Pipeline

Canada has always been an important supplier of resources to America. In fact, Canada is the single largest source of our imported oil.  But there is an opportunity to access even more oil that Canada wants to sell to the U.S. and replace imports from unfriendly countries.

Gas prices are a key concern to our economic well-being, but we also need to worry about the countries we rely on for oil.  Currently America  relies too much on the Middle East, Nigeria, Angola, and South American dictator Hugo Chavez for our oil supply.  Increasing our oil supply from a friendly neighbor like Canada will have positive effects on our nation's energy security.  The construction of the Keystone XL pipeline will help accomplish that goal by dramatically increasing oil imports sands from Canada to American refineries.  

The federal government must take action to allow the building of the Keystone XL pipeline to get Canadian oil sands to American refineries; however, the Obama administration has been delaying the construction of the pipeline since 2008.  Fortunately, the State Department is in the final stages of determining whether to approve a permit for the pipeline.

If America passes up this opportunity to build the pipeline, Canada will find another market for its oil, and the thousands of refinery, construction and related jobs that go with it.
 
Almost 1,000 U.S. companies in 47 states are suppliers of materials, equipment, or services to support Canadian oil sands production.  According to the Canadian Energy Research Institute, the development of oil sands in Canada will have an economic impact leading to more than 342,000 new American jobs in the next five years and add $34 billion to U.S. gross domestic product in 2015.  The infrastructure to transport Canadian oil to the U.S. will also mean more tax revenue for state and local governments to fund critical services.